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Facsimilie Reprints - Africana - Hunting Series

A selection of unique early african hunting travel exploration books.
The 12 volume series as published by Books of Rhodesia / Books of Zimbabwe

Includes well know names:- FC Selous, WC Baldwin, RG Cumming, W Finaughty, AH Neumann, Lieut. AW Hodson, Capt. CH Stigand, Capt. Cornwallis Harris, DD Lyell, J Sutherland, O Letcher
Layout Table~~~~383~383~~
Africana - Hunting Series~Southern Africa~~~383~4602~~
Notes~- The background of the publication of this series - African Hunting Series
- The titles listed below are the Standard Editions, subject to availability - please email us first before placing an order for any of these books. Prices are subject to change at short notice. Leather bound editions prices on request.
Only Surface Mail with 'Signed For plus Insurance' can be used as the shipping method, and this MUST be selected in the Check Out

~~~383~530~~
Vol. 1 A Hunter's Life in South Africa : Vol 1 - RG Cumming~A particularly fine example of Victorian sporting literature, this work was markedly succesfull and ran into many editions. Gordon Cumming writes of his hunting expedition which started from Grahamstown in October 1843 and which took him through country-side teeming with game - "... 'one vast herd' of springboks; as far as the eye could strain..." - to the Orange river and the Griqualand West where he met Oswell, and, at Kuruman, Robert Moffat and, soon after, David Livingstone. . . . .
~John Murray, London, 1850, two vols.
Reprints:
Vol 1, xxxviii, 389pp., 6 illus., 1 map; newfrontispiece, new Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof.James a. Casada. ISBN (Std) 0 86920 209 X, (Dlx) 0 86920 210 3
Vol. 2, xx, 381pp., 11 illus. ISBN (Std) 0 86920 211 1, (Dlx) 086920 212 X
A particularly fine example of Victorian sporting literature, this work was markedly succesfull and ran into many editions. Gordon Cumming writes of his hunting expedition which started from Grahamstown in October 1843 and which took him through country-side teeming with game - "... 'one vast herd' of springboks; as far as the eye could strain..." - to the Orange river and the Griqualand West where he met Oswell, and, at Kuruman, Robert Moffat and, soon after, David Livingstone.

He appears to have hunted every species of South Africa fauna and to have indulged himself in the sport to an extent almost unique even amongst the mighty hunters of Africa. The narrative is valuable for its description of the country and its inhabitants, and for its zoological and botanical notes.

Over six feet tall and weighing fourteen stone, Gording Cumming, who became widely known as 'The Lion Hunter', was a man of splendid physique and great physical strength. Never one to bow to convention, he astonished the Dutchmen as he "wore neither trousers nor leggings, and went about in a kind of kilt, leaving the legs bare."

In 1843 he joined the Cape Mounted Rifles in South Africa. But a military career was not for him and after partcipating in one operation on the Eastern Frontier he set out on his hunting expedition into the interior.

Returning to Britain in 1848, he devoted himself to writing and in 1851 a selection of his hunting trophies went on display at the Great Exhibition at Crystal Palace.

Within ten years of his return from South Africa he set up his own permanent museum at Fort Augustus on the Caledonian Canal where he died on 24 March 1866.
~Vol. 1 A Hunter%27s Life in South Africa %3A Vol 1 - RG Cumming|C ISBN 086920209X|~383~2534~ A Hunter%27s Life in South Africa %3A Vol 1 - RG Cumming~
Vol. 2 A Hunter's Life in South Africa : Vol 2 - RG Cumming~A particularly fine example of Victorian sporting literature, this work was markedly succesfull and ran into many editions. Gordon Cumming writes of his hunting expedition which started from Grahamstown in October 1843 and which took him through country-side teeming with game - "... 'one vast herd' of springboks; as far as the eye could strain..." - to the Orange river and the Griqualand West where he met Oswell, and, at Kuruman, Robert Moffat and, soon after, David Livingstone. . . . .
~John Murray, London, 1850, two vols.
Reprints:
Vol 1, xxxviii, 389pp., 6 illus., 1 map; newfrontispiece, new Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof.James a. Casada. ISBN (Std) 0 86920 209 X, (Dlx) 0 86920 210 3
Vol. 2, xx, 381pp., 11 illus. ISBN (Std) 0 86920 211 1, (Dlx) 086920 212 X
A particularly fine example of Victorian sporting literature, this work was markedly succesfull and ran into many editions. Gordon Cumming writes of his hunting expedition which started from Grahamstown in October 1843 and which took him through country-side teeming with game - "... 'one vast herd' of springboks; as far as the eye could strain..." - to the Orange river and the Griqualand West where he met Oswell, and, at Kuruman, Robert Moffat and, soon after, David Livingstone.

He appears to have hunted every species of South Africa fauna and to have indulged himself in the sport to an extent almost unique even amongst the mighty hunters of Africa. The narrative is valuable for its description of the country and its inhabitants, and for its zoological and botanical notes.

Over six feet tall and weighing fourteen stone, Gording Cumming, who became widely known as 'The Lion Hunter', was a man of splendid physique and great physical strength. Never one to bow to convention, he astonished the Dutchmen as he "wore neither trousers nor leggings, and went about in a kind of kilt, leaving the legs bare."

In 1843 he joined the Cape Mounted Rifles in South Africa. But a military career was not for him and after partcipating in one operation on the Eastern Frontier he set out on his hunting expedition into the interior.

Returning to Britain in 1848, he devoted himself to writing and in 1851 a selection of his hunting trophies went on display at the Great Exhibition at Crystal Palace.

Within ten years of his return from South Africa he set up his own permanent museum at Fort Augustus on the Caledonian Canal where he died on 24 March 1866.
~Vol. 2 A Hunter%27s Life in South Africa %3A Vol 2 - RG Cumming|C ISBN 0869202111|~383~2535~A Hunter%27s Life in South Africa %3A Vol 2 - RG Cumming~
Vol. 3 The Recollections of an Elephant Hunter:1864-1875 - W Finaughty~When William Finaughty, a member of an 1820 Settler family from Grahamstown, made the first of his hunting trips to Mzilikazi's Matabeleland in 1864 at the age of twenty-one, the land teemed with wild life.
In the winter of 1866 he began hunting for ivory in Mashonaland and during the next five years is credited with killing over five hundred elephant. By 1871 the herds had withdrawn to the safer tsetse fly areas into which men such as Finaughty, who preferred to hunt on horseback, were less likely to penetrate. For eleven years covered by his Recollections he traded and shot for ivory, mainly in the south-west of Rhodesia and in Botswana. . . . . .
~J.B. Lippincott, Philadelphia, 1916. Reprint: xxviii, 244pp., 9 illus.,1 map; new frontispiece, new Publishers' Note and new Publishers'Introduction, and new Foreward by Edward C. Tabler.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 229 4, (Dlx) 086920 230 8
When William Finaughty, a member of an 1820 Settler family from Grahamstown, made the first of his hunting trips to Mzilikazi's Matabeleland in 1864 at the age of twenty-one, the land teemed with wild life.

In the winter of 1866 he began hunting for ivory in Mashonaland and during the next five years is credited with killing over five hundred elephant. By 1871 the herds had withdrawn to the safer tsetse fly areas into which men such as Finaughty, who preferred to hunt on horseback, were less likely to penetrate. For eleven years covered by his Recollections he traded and shot for ivory, mainly in the south-west of Rhodesia and in Botswana.

Skilled in bushcraft, fit and fearless, he hunted on horseback, using an old muzzle loader. His book is full of incident and encounter - with contemporary hunters, missionaries, traders and explorers, among them Jan Viljoen, Henry Hartley, Thomas Baines, Chapman, Francis, Sam Edwards, Leask, Phillips, Mauch, Mohr and many others.

Garnish is added to the hunting fare by his stories of the Matabele (he met Mzilikazi and Lobengula), of the crafty bushmen, of of veld lore. His unadorned descriptions of the harsh realities of bush life, of the ever-present danger from marauding lions, of fever, the lack of water and the tsetse fly impress and well as inform and entertain.

He renounced muzzle-loading, smooth-bore adventure for trading, and by 1894 he moved with his family to Rhodesia.

His Recollections were recorded by R.N. Hall who originally published them as a series of reminiscences in the The Rhodesia Journal, A Weekly Newspaper of Rhodesian Information, in 1911. George L. Harrison, a visiting American hunter heard of his exploits and after visiting him in 1913 returned home with almost complete set of the journals. (one chapter was missing) He had them published in a limited edition of 250 copies by the J.B. Lippincott Company in 1916. A second edition including the missing chapter was printed in 1957 by A.A.Balkema of Cape Town.

The book was reset and with additional sketch map, illustrations and notes was published by Books of Rhodesia, Bulawayo, in 1973.~Vol. 3 The Recollections of an Elephant Hunter%3A1864-1875 - W Finaughty|C ISBN 0869202294|~383~2536~The Recollections of an Elephant Hunter%3A1864-1875 - W Finaughty~
Vol. 4 African Hunting - WC Baldwin~Baldwin has a honoured place in the gallery of Africa's white hunters of the nineteenth century. Arriving at Durban in 1851, he became one of this continent's great travellers, journeying between 12000 and 15000 miles with his wagons during the last three years of his wanderings. In 1860 he earned the distinction of becoming the second known non-African to reach the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River. . . . .
~Richard Bentley, London, 1863, (second edition).
Reprint: xxii, 451pp., 47 illus., 1 map, new Introduction by Gary W. Clendennen
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 227 8, (Dlx) 0 86920 228 6
Baldwin has a honoured place in the gallery of Africa's white hunters of the nineteenth century. Arriving at Durban in 1851, he became one of this continent's great travellers, journeying between 12000 and 15000 miles with his wagons during the last three years of his wanderings. In 1860 he earned the distinction of becoming the second known non-African to reach the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River.

Soon after his arrival in Natal, Baldwin joined a party, to Zululand, of eleven men led by 'Elephant' White. Some went to the Pongolo river after elephant, and the others, including Baldwin, to St. Lucia Bay to shoot hippo. He was one of the four survivors of the expedition.

In 1854 he hunted in the Amatonga country and three years later, after a second journey to Zululand, he crossed into the Transvaal where he was offered some 3000 acres of land, for the price of a plough, in the area which is now the Witswatersrand.

His first attempt to visit Mzilikazi's country, present-day Zimbabwe, having failed, he set off the following year for Ngamiland but found the Transvaal and the Orange Free State at war. He was arrested on charge of smuggling ammunition and had nearly all his powder and lead confiscated. He reached Lake Ngami on 11 June1858 after having killed, on the Botletle river, his first elephant in his six years in Africa. On his trip to the Zambezi two years later he and his companions bagged sixty-one elephants.

Clendennen writes: "For those who relish the joy of the chase, the fragrance of coffee over the evening camp-fire, and the intricate counterpoint of the African symphony, Baldwin has written a classic. Through its pages parades a seemingly inexhaustible menangerie of the land, from the smallest ducks to the mightiest elephants - with Baldwin and his companions in hot pursuit."~Vol. 4 African Hunting - WC Baldwin|C ISBN 0869202278|~383~2537~African Hunting - WC Baldwin~
Vol. 5 A Hunter's Wanderings in Africa - FC Selous~Frederick Courtney Selous was born in London in 1851 of intellectuals whose wide interests included natural history. After completing his formal education at Rugby and on the Continent, he sailed for Africa at the age of nineteen to become an elephant hunter.
An acknowledged classic on wildlife and hunting on boths sides of the Zambezi, A Hunter's Wnderings in Africa spans nine fascinating years (1871-80) in the life of Selous, a legendary 'great' of the decade prior to the formal occupation of the country which became known as Rhodesia. . . . .
~Richard Bentley & Son, London 1881.
Reprint: xxxiv, 455pp., 65 illus., 1 map; new frontispiece, new Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof. James A. Casada.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 239 1, (Dlx) 0 86920 238 3
FREDERICK COURTNEY SELOUS was born in London in 1851 of intellectuals whose wide interests included natural history. After completing his formal education at Rugby and on the Continent, he sailed for Africa at the age of nineteen to become an elephant hunter.

An acknowledged classic on wildlife and hunting on boths sides of the Zambezi, A Hunter's Wnderings in Africa spans nine fascinating years (1871-80) in the life of Selous, a legendary 'great' of the decade prior to the formal occupation of the country which became known as Rhodesia.

Written during an era when ivory was the principal commodity of trade with the interior of Africa, the work presents one of the best descriptions of the life of an African big game hunter and is rich record of the fauna of that period.

Selous relates how he visited Lobengula at Gubuluwayo to seek permission to hunt elephant, drawing a contemptuous comment from the old king on his youthfulness. In the company of an assortment of companions he made yearly trips into the Umniati, Sebakwe, Umfuli and Hunyani areas, and north to the Chobe, the Sanyati and over the Zambezi into the territory of the Batonka.

He confined his hunting mainly to large game: elephant, rhinoceros and buffalo but inevitably encountered lion and other predators.

For a weapon he used the Boer four-bore muzzle-loader with four ounce round bullets, and when not in the fly belt he preferred to hunt on horseback.

Among Selous' admirers and inimate friends was President Theodore Roosevelt with whom he hunted in East Africa.

Selous' biographer, Millais, wrote of him; "Selous set a standard of conduct which people of our own, as well as those of other nations, might be proud to follow. He, as it were, stamped his personality on the wilderness, where life is hard and man easily loses his grip."~Vol. 5 A Hunter%27s Wanderings in Africa|C ISBN 0869202391|~383~2538~A Hunter%27s Wanderings in Africa - FC Selous~
Vol. 6 Elephant Hunting in East Equatorial Africa - AH Neumann~Of the books in this list, this work by Arthur Neumann is now perhaps the most rare in the original. As stated in the sub-title, it is an account of three years' ivory-hunting under Mount Kenya and among the Ndorobo savages of the Lorogi Mountains, including a trip to the north end of Lake Rudolph. At the time of which he wrote, these parts were unvisited by hunters. . . .
~Rowland Ward, London, 1898.
Reprints: xxx, 455pp., 66 illus., 1 map; new frontispiece, new Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof. James a. Casada.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 246 4, (Dlx) 0 86920 245 6
Of the books in this list, this work by Arthur Neumann is now perhaps the most rare in the original. As stated in the sub-title, it is an account of three years' ivory-hunting under Mount Kenya and among the Ndorobo savages of the Lorogi Mountains, including a trip to the north end of Lake Rudolph. At the time of which he wrote, these parts were unvisited by hunters.

Born in 1850, son of an English rector, Neumann sailed for Natal at eighteen, and with his brother engaged in growing cotton and tobacco on the Umvoti, dug gold in the Transvaal and traded in Swaziland; and, in 1879, served in the Zulu War. He then travelled and hunted extensively around the Limpopo and Sabi rivers.

His ambition to hunt elephants professionally was fired when, as a employee of Sir William Mackinnon's chartered company in 1890, he reconnoitered a proposed railway to Lake Victoria - a region that was a hunter's paradise. The years 1893-96 took him from Mombasa, across Mount Kenya to Lake Rudolf and back, shooting on the way, elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus and many types of thin skinned game animals. Then followed an interlude of service in the Anglo-Boer War when he took part in the relief of Ladysmith. The war over, he returned to the Mount Kenya area, and in 1903 and 1904 he ranged through the Lorian Swamp, Turkana, and northern Gwaso Nyiro.

Both Lyell and Millais praised his hunting skills. He was, too, a keen lepidopterist, and obtained specimens of three new species of butterfly belonging to the genera Mylothris, Catachrysops and Mycalesis, one of which, Mylothris neumanni was named after him. These are illustrated in a colour plate.

The book which ranks high in the corpus of African hunting literature is richly illustrated with plates by artists Millais, Caldwell and Lodge; and the author's photographs.
~Vol. 6 Elephant Hunting in East Equatorial Africa - AH Neumann|C ISBN 0869202464|~383~2539~Elephant Hunting in East Equatorial Africa - AH Neumann~
Vol. 7 Trekking the Great Thirst - Lieut. AW Hodson~Trekking the Great Thirst was first published in book form in 1912, much of it having originated as contemporary articles written for sporting and other popular magazines. It deals mainly with journeys and hunting expeditions of the author in Bechuanaland Protectorate (Botswana) in the years 1904-1919.
His duties as a policeman and magistrate took him into the most remote parts of the territory, one of the his missions being the Damaraland frontier at the time of the Herero and Nama Wars in German South-West Africa. . . . .
~T. Fisher Unwin, London, 1912.
Reprints: xxxvi, 342pp., 85illus., 4 maps; new colour frontispiece, and new Foreward by Prof. R.S.Roberts.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 263 4, (Dlx) 0 86920 262 6
Trekking the Great Thirst was first published in book form in 1912, much of it having originated as contemporary articles written for sporting and other popular magazines. It deals mainly with journeys and hunting expeditions of the author in Bechuanaland Protectorate (Botswana) in the years 1904-1919.

His duties as a policeman and magistrate took him into the most remote parts of the territory, one of the his missions being the Damaraland frontier at the time of the Herero and Nama Wars in German South-West Africa. He was also much involved in trying to reconcile conflicts between tribal chiefs. His several political missions, on which his narrative runs, cover a most important period of the history of Botswana, and his account gives an informative picture of the character of the people, their mode of living, and the harshness of the waterless regions with their great trackless distances.

One of his journeys, in 1906, was made in the company of Sir Ralph Williams, Resident Commisioner, and was from Serowe to Livingstone and the Victoria Falls via Lake Ngami. Four years later Hodson organised a hunting trip for High Commissioner Selborne, from Pandamatenga to Selous' old camp on the Mabebe Flats and on to the Chobe. This chapter is contributed by Frederick Vaughan Kirby, who wrote In the Haunts of Wild Game.

The hunting highlights of the book are reminscent of the descriptions of game given by such early sportsmen as Gordon Cumming (1850) and Kirby (1896).

Hodson became in turn Governor of the Falkland Islands (1926), Sierra Leone (1930), and the Gold Coast (1934). He was knighted in 1934.

He was the author of several books, two of them dealing with hunting expeditions in Abyssinia.

~Vol. 7 Trekking the Great Thirst - Lieut. AW Hodson|C ISBN 0869202634|~383~2540~Trekking the Great Thirst - Lieut. AW Hodson~
Vol. 8 Hunting the Elephant in Africa and other Recollections of Thirteen years's Wanderings - Capt. CH Stigand~Chauncey Hugh Stigand was born in France in 1877 while his father was the the British Consul there. He demonstrated early academic talents and was exposed to the maturing benefits of foreign travel at a youthful age. His cultured family background and meetings with many intellectuals and dignitaries influenced the shapings of his career.
He opted for the Army and obtained a commission with the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment with a posting to Burma. In 1900 he moved to Aden and from this base acquired a good knowlege of the East African coast. . . . .
~Macmillan, New York, 1913.
Reprints: xl, 379pp., 23illus., new frontispiece, new Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof. James A. Casada.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 250 2, (Dlx) 0 86920 249 9
Chauncey Hugh Stigand was born in France in 1877 while his father was the the British Consul there. He demonstrated early academic talents and was exposed to the maturing benefits of foreign travel at a youthful age. His cultured family background and meetings with many intellectuals and dignitaries influenced the shapings of his career.

He opted for the Army and obtained a commission with the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment with a posting to Burma. In 1900 he moved to Aden and from this base acquired a good knowlege of the East African coast. While a member of the First Somali Expedition, in 1901, he killed his first leopard. His entry to the hunting grounds of East Africa came by way of an appointment to the King's African Rifles at Zomba in Nyasaland. In this ideal environment he combined his military duties with the pursuits of field naturalist and a literary career through which he was to establish a reputation as an authority on African wildlife. His first book, Central African Game and Its Spoor, was jointly authored with Denis D. Lyell, who wrote The African Elephant and its Hunters (included in this series).

In 1908, in company with Capt. R.S. Hart, Stigand hunted through Uganda, the Congo Free State, the Lado Enclave and parts of Abyssinia. Two years later he was appointed British Representative in the Lado Enclave where he completed his magnum opus, the book now being introduced.

It carries a foreward by President Theodore Roosevelt and was published in 1913 before the outbreak of World War 1, in a single printing, which accounts for its rarity. In this wide-ranging and at times amusing work Stigand draws upon his wealth of experience to write upon a diverse range of African topics. Wrote one reviewer: "The elephant hardly more than justifies his place of honour in the title."
~Vol. 8 Hunting the Elephant in Africa and other Recollections of Thirteen years%27s Wanderings - Capt. CH Stigand|C ISBN 0869202502|~383~2541~ Hunting the Elephant in Africa and other Recollections of Thirteen years%27s Wanderings - Capt. CH Stigand~
Vol. 9 The Wild Sports of Southern Africa - Capt. WC Harris~The epic hunting expedition of Capt Cornwallis Harris, an officer of the Indian Army, Bombay, and his companion William Richardson, who travelled from Graaff Reinet in the Cape to the Tropic of Capricorn, more specifically to the capital of Moselekatse (Mzilikazi), king of the Matabele, near present day Rustenburg, in 1836, resulted in two outstanding literary and artistic works of Africana: The Wild Sports of Sourhern Africa, here described, and Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa - the most highly prized large folio of coloured engravings of South African fauna and scenery. . . . .
~Pelham Richardson, Cornhill, London, 1844 (fourth ed.).
Reprints: xx + newly contributed Introduction, 359pp., 26 colour plates, 1 map; new frontispiece.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 265 0, (Dlx) 0 86920 264 2
THE epic hunting expedition of Capt Cornwallis Harris, an officer of the Indian Army, Bombay, and his companion William Richardson, who travelled from Graaff Reinet in the Cape to the Tropic of Capricorn, more specifically to the capital of Moselekatse (Mzilikazi), king of the Matabele, near present day Rustenburg, in 1836, resulted in two outstanding literary and artistic works of Africana: The Wild Sports of Sourhern Africa, here described, and Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa - the most highly prized large folio of coloured engravings of South African fauna and scenery.

Twenty-six plates of unsurpassed excellence from the ten-month expedition appear in The Wild Sports of Southern Africa.

The two hunters penetrated areas not yet settled by white men; in fact, their visit coincided with the Great Trek of farmers from the Eastern Cape coast to the distant hinterland. Harris makes perceptive comment on this major historical event. Their route lay across the Orange and Vaal rivers to Mosega and along the Magaliesberg range where they saw 300 elephant in one herd. He apparently crossed the valley where Pretoria now stands possibly the first white man to do so - pushing on to the Limpopo river which was followed to its junction with the Notwani. Striking south, the expedition returned to the Magaliesberg area where the first recorded sable antelope was seen, for many years thereafter known as the Harris buck.
Traversing the Witwatersrand they encountered a herd of several hundred eland. . . then on to the locality of present-day Potchefstroom and Bloemfontein.

The picture painted by Harris is of vast herds of animals swarming across the veld: "herds of quaggas and brindled gnoos estimated to contain 15 000 animals . . . the country being chequered black and white with their congregated masses.

The first edition of this work appeared in 1839. This valuable fourth edition has two additional chapters on the massacre of Retief and his party of Trekkers.
~Vol. 9 The Wild Sports of Southern Africa - Capt. WC Harris|C ISBN 0869202650|~383~2542~ The Wild Sports of Southern Africa - Capt. WC Harris~
Vol. 10 The African Elephant and it's Hunters - DD Lyell~This is the fourth book on hunting from the pen of Denis Lyell, a hunter with a long and practical experience of his subject gained in Nyasaland, North Eastern Rhodesia and Portugese East Africa from 1898. It is chatty in its style and is rich in information on elephants and their habits, hints on hunting them, their ivory, and the dangers generally of hunting elephants and other game. This sage advice with its fascinating facts is threaded with anecdote in which many of the authors in this Series, and other renowned hunters, are mentioned. . . . .
~Heath Cranton Ltd., London, 1924
Reprints: xx + newly contributed Introduction, 221pp., 13colour plates, new frontispiece.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 272 3, (Dlx) 0 86920 271 5
This is the fourth book on hunting from the pen of Denis Lyell, a hunter with a long and practical experience of his subject gained in Nyasaland, North Eastern Rhodesia and Portugese East Africa from 1898. It is chatty in its style and is rich in information on elephants and their habits, hints on hunting them, their ivory, and the dangers generally of hunting elephants and other game. This sage advice with its fascinating facts is threaded with anecdote in which many of the authors in this Series, and other renowned hunters, are mentioned.

Among those who feature are Sir Samuel Baker, W. Cotton Oswell, Gordon Cumming, Cornwallis Harris, Baldwin, Stigand, Finaughty, Sutherland and Neumann to which he adds comment and appraisal. Neumann he named as "the greatest elephant hunter who ever lived".

He discusses hunting weapons and includes a sketch showing the positions of vital shots for an elephant: brain, heart and lungs. There is an account of the cutting up of a carcass by the local inhabitants of the area where the animal was shot. The African names for an elephant in different areas are given.

In a chapter on the old 'greats' of elephant hunting he compares the weapons of the early Victorian hunters with the 'modern' guns he used.

His inclusion of Messrs Lewis & Peat's pamphlet Ivory: General Information (revised to April 1923) sheds light on the special uses to which the various types of ivory are put.

Reference to the legendary so-called 'elephant cemeteries' recalls Cullen Gouldsbury's poem 'The Place Where the Elephants Die'.

All in all a charming book illustrated with photographs by the author.
~Vol. 10 The African Elephant and it%27s Hunters - DD Lyell|C ISBN 0869202723|~383~2543~The African Elephant and it%27s Hunters - DD Lyell~
Vol. 11 The Adventures of an Elephant Hunter - J Sutherland~James Sutherland, born in Scotland in 1872, is remembered among the greats of Africa's professional elephant hunters, and as the author of one of the finest of the continent's hunting classics, his one and only venture into authorship. His stamping grounds were the territories of south-east Africa stretching between Mozambique and southern Sudan.
He came to South Africa aged twenty-four without any fixed ideas of a career. For a while he thought of becoming a professional boxer; instead he ran African trading stores and later took on a job as a labour overseer on the construction of the Beira-Mashonaland railway. On the outbreak of the Anglo-Boer War in 1899 he moved into the African hinterland to hunt elephant professionally. . . . .
~Macmillan & Co. Ltd., London, 1912.
Reprint: xx + newly contributed Introduction and Bibliographical Note by Prof. James a. Casada, 324pp., 53illus.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 248 0, (Dlx) 0 86920 274 2
James Sutherland, born in Scotland in 1872, is remembered among the greats of Africa's professional elephant hunters, and as the author of one of the finest of the continent's hunting classics, his one and only venture into authorship. His stamping grounds were the territories of south-east Africa stretching between Mozambique and southern Sudan.

He came to South Africa aged twenty-four without any fixed ideas of a career. For a while he thought of becoming a professional boxer; instead he ran African trading stores and later took on a job as a labour overseer on the construction of the Beira-Mashonaland railway. On the outbreak of the Anglo-Boer War in 1899 he moved into the African hinterland to hunt elephant professionally. This he did continuously for the latter thirty-odd years of his life. Despite the fact that his arrival in the hunting fields came at a time when Africa's elephant population was already in serious decline, and that he was twice involved in military service - in 1905-1906 and 1914-1918 - his career kills, counting bulls only, were estimated to total over 1000 elephants.

Professor James A. Casada says of Sutherland in a newly contributed Introduction, "... we have an extraordinary first-hand account of what the lives of many who cared only for the chase was like. ... Once you become immersed in Sutherland's pages, realisation rapidly dawns that for him - as was widely true of ivory hunters - the wealth to be derived from 'white gold' was strictly incidental. Their real motivation was the thrill of the chase, the sheer joy of adventure..."

He hunted to the end, death coming to him at the Yubo Sleeping Sickness Camp in the heart of the southern Sudan on June26, 1932, in his 60th year. His remains were interred in the land of elephants he so loved. Friends later erected a bronze tablet on the spot, engraved with two elephants standing beneath a palm tree. It reads, in part, " To the Memory of that great elephant Hunter - JIM SUTHERLAND."
~Vol. 11 The Adventures of an Elephant Hunter - J Sutherland|C ISBN 0869202480|~383~2544~The Adventures of an Elephant Hunter - J Sutherland~
Vol. 12 The Bonds of Africa - O Letcher~Owen Letcher was among the the vanguard of a new breed of 'tourist' trophy sportsmen who made their appearance with the arrival of the railway at the Zambezi. A trip to the railhead at Broken Hill (today's Kabwe in Zambia) in 1907, prompted Letcher to undertake his first shooting safari into the little patronised but incredibly rich wild-life region of North-Eastern Rhodesia, famed for its scenically beautiful Luangwa valley. Moving through North-Eastern Rhodesia to its boundaries with Nyasaland and Mozambique, he built up his collection of antelope trophy heads. some of them now rarities. In Awemba territory towards the Muehinga. he bagged his first elephant. In the Lake Bangweolo region, sittutunga, lechwe and tsessebe were hunted, also pookoo, reed-buck, hartebeest, and a Crawshay's variety (Cobus defassa crawshai) of waterbuck. In the Tumbwa swamps there were the handsome black lechwe. . . . .
~John Long Limited, London, 1913.
Reprints: xi + newly contributed Introduction, 3268pp., 50illus., 1 map; new frontispiece.
ISBN (Std) 0 86920 274 X, (Dlx) 0 86920 275 8
Owen Letcher was among the the vanguard of a new breed of 'tourist' trophy sportsmen who made their appearance with the arrival of the railway at the Zambezi. A trip to the railhead at Broken Hill (today's Kabwe in Zambia) in 1907, prompted Letcher to undertake his first shooting safari into the little patronised but incredibly rich wild-life region of North-Eastern Rhodesia, famed for its scenically beautiful Luangwa valley. Moving through North-Eastern Rhodesia to its boundaries with Nyasaland and Mozambique, he built up his collection of antelope trophy heads. some of them now rarities. In Awemba territory towards the Muehinga. he bagged his first elephant. In the Lake Bangweolo region, sittutunga, lechwe and tsessebe were hunted, also pookoo, reed-buck, hartebeest, and a Crawshay's variety (Cobus defassa crawshai) of waterbuck. In the Tumbwa swamps there were the handsome black lechwe.

In British East Africa (Kenya) the reader is introduced to the Rift Valley and the Masai, Thomson's and Grant's gazelle, jigger fleas, the Uganda railway, and colobus monkeys. Further unrolling of the map revealed such other interest points as Mombasa and Zanzibar, Entebbe, the Ripon Falls. and the mystical allure of the lower Nile and the Egypt of l 911. And so a down-to-earth hunting saga ends as a fascinating tourist extravaganza on the Mediterranean! His narrative is entertaining, informative and vividly colourful.

Letcher was born at Redruth, Cornwall on 27th May 1884, and he became a graduate of the Redruth School of Mines, a background which drew him to the gold-mines of the Witwatersrand. He developed a passion for world travel and big-game hunting in Africa, and authored many books. In World War 1 (1914-18) he served with the South African Forces, under General Smuts in South-West and East Africa. He entered the field of mining journalism in the 1920s and for a number of years he was editor of the South African Mining and Engineering Journal. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society. He died in Johannesburg on 14th October 1943.
~Vol. 12 The Bonds of Africa - O Letcher|C ISBN 08692027|~383~2545~The Bonds of Africa - O Letcher~
"Full" set of available African Hunting Reprint Series books.~'Full' set of the above available reprints. NOTE last few remaining copies left, with a few titles already 'Out of Print'. Please contact us BEFORE ordering as final cost will vary due to foreign currency flucations.
Only Surface Mail with 'Signed For plus Insurance' can be used as the shipping method, and this MUST be selected in the Check Out
(We can provide a reasonably good 'second hand' full set, subject to us locating individual good quality copies - this can take time, with the order being sent in small batches.) ~~Select set||Full set of 12 volumes African Hunting Reprint Series|C Hunt set|Full set of 12 volumes African Hunting Reprint Series - Buffalo bound with slipcase|C Hunt set - Buffalo leather|Full set of 12 volumes African Hunting Reprint Series (UK Set)|9761|~383~2546~~
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